Tag Archives: children

Some victims of ‘fancy dress’

As I’m on holidays for another couple of weeks, and I was doing some art in the garden with the kids this afternoon, I kept going and made a few tiny images for the start of this year’s 52 Week Illustration Challenge on Facebook.

Week 1 is Fancy Dress.

I went naturally to my cabinet card portrait collection where there are plenty of people in both fancy dresses and in ‘fancy dress’ in the sense of costume.  There I saw lots of kids who had been hauled, strapped, tied or stuffed into their best clothes for portraits; many of them looking dubious about the whole experience. So I thought I’d borrow their misery for a few little ink and wash drawings.

W1 fancy dress unwilling suit boy judywatsonart lores

A little boy in fancy dress, from a cabinet card portrait. It was hard to say if he was in his best clothes or in costume. The clothes are somewhat smart but also very oversized, especially the hat!

W1 fancy dress unwilling girl judywatsonart lores

A little girl who would rather be playing with her dog in the garden

W1 fancy dress - scottish judywatsonart lores

A little Scottish lad in fancy dress looking very miserable

Department of Education and Training early learning wall friezes

To prove I’m still here, I’m popping up some single illustrations done for the Department of Education and Training this year. The brief read thus:

The purpose of the four wall friezes is to encourage families to engage in learning activities with their child everyday. On each frieze there will be eight panels – a cover and a panel for each day of the week, with a different illustration of a family member(s) and a child/children engaged in a learning activity related to the theme. For example:

    • Music: dancing/singing, etc.
    • Science: cooking/exploring nature, etc.
    • Maths/numeracy: counting/measuring/block building/puzzles, etc.
    • Imaginative play: dress ups/cubby houses/pretend play/creative play spaces, etc.

The DET are happy for me to post fragments of the artwork I did for them, and you will hopefully come across the full design somewhere; perhaps in your local library.

Not surprisingly there was a dog or a chicken in each illustration… Oh actually, I couldn’t find a hygienic way to get a dog or a chicken onto the kitchen bench for the Maths illustration. Rats.

(…There were no rats in the kitchen either.)

kids play music JudyWatsonArt

A fragment: Music

Tommy from Thunderstorm Dancing enjoyed a new incarnation here. So did some of the other characters.

little spaniel from Imaginative play JudyWatsonArt

A (small) fragment: Imaginative play.

There’s that spaniel again. She keeps popping up.

my boys do cooking Maths JudyWatsonArt

A fragment: maths

My 12 year old got morphed into a 15 year old for this illustration. That was fun. I morphed him back again later. I’m not ready for a 15 year old.

Geeky little girl enjoys science with chicken friend

A fragment: science

Geeky girl gardener enjoys some science play. I like a geeky girl and I like her taste in chickens.

Monotypes with Dad in the garden on a Sunday

Lovely to have a day off yesterday, and to spend it with Dad and the boys, (as well as Scott when he wasn’t on board his yacht admiring seals in the bay). Dad suggested we do some monotypes, and we finally got around to it in the late afternoon.  It was really pleasant in the garden, and we could use the hose to easily clean off our plates without messing up the bath as I usually do at home. Boy, you should see it after a printing session!

We didn’t get too fussed about what we drew, and we were mostly messing about trying to find a paper that would take the monotype process and a bit of ink added afterwards.

Unfortunately I didn’t get a photo of Dad’s pictures, but he probably wouldn’t have let me post them anyway!

little dark girl monotype lores

This little dark girl was taken from a photo and was an experiment in drawing with big, angular shapes and using high contrast. It’s so tricky to draw children without the results looking sentimental, because the subject of children is so heavily laden with very strong human emotion, and many pictures of children actively seek to communicate those emotions. This drawing probably looks sentimental too, just because the child is thoughtful or pensive. She certainly wasn’t meant to look like she’d left her favourite teddy in the park. I just loved her blocky haircut and the shapes her interlocking arms made. Oh, and the reason I was drawing a child (on my day off, ha ha!) was because I decided to join in a Facebook group with a weekly illustration topic, just for fun. This week’s topic was ‘children’.

The paper was medium weight, and was fine with the monotype process, but didn’t cope with the ink wash afterwards. Buckled all over the place. Earlier, we tried with 300 gsm watercolour paper and couldn’t get an ink impression because it was too stiff. Wetting the paper didn’t work too well either, because our block printing ink is water based. (I think the ink used in intaglio printing onto wet paper is oil based. Somebody tell me if I’m wrong.)

monotype altered book cat lores

The cat was a bit of fun for me as I suddenly had the happy thought that I could combine altered book art with monotype. Although the page was rudely removed from the book, as you can see, it did cope perfectly with the ink, and also coped rather well with the wash afterwards. Strangely, it has a fine, sparkly thing happening in the dark areas when I hold it to the light. It must be to do with the paper, as it isn’t the ink, I’m sure.

monotype blue boy lores

This little guy was done on very lightweight paper and the monotype line is rather delicate because there was not a heavy load of ink on the plate. I added chinese ink, Prismacolour artstick and soft pastel afterwards to give him a bit of contrast, and the original monotype line is barely there. The paper of course, buckled.

Thanks for an enjoyable afternoon, Dad!

Swimming again

Swimming again, or rather, watching the swimming. Here were some of my more immediate neighbours on the spectator benches at swimming lessons this week.

My fine-point pens had died of exhaustion, so I enjoyed using a thicker felt tip instead, and later adding a bit of pencil colour at the drawing board was fun.

auburn haired swimmer

auburn haired swimmer – this little boy has a spectacular head of flaming orange-red.

blue sibling

blue sibling – she found Ollie the Octopus’s antics amusing

green sibling

green sibling – same sibling, different colour

Mum with mobile phone

Mum with mobile phone – most of the spectators spend a lot of time watching their phones. It’s a funny world we live in now. I do it too sometimes.

long-haired mum with tissue long-haired mum

Pool noodle doodles

I guess if I paid my models more they might stay still…

This toddler (holding Mum's hand) stayed still, staring intently into my face for long enough to imprint her eyes upon me. The rest is just modified memory :-)

This toddler (holding Mum’s hand) stayed still, staring intently into my face for long enough to imprint her eyes upon me. The rest is just modified memory :-)

This was a dad with three youngsters. He stayed still just about as long as you might expect of a dad looking after three youngsters. (all boys.)

This was a dad with three youngsters. He stayed still just about as long as you might expect of a dad looking after three youngsters. (all boys.)

Buy ‘The Swimmer’ on Etsy here.

sold

This little fellow stayed still in the way of a goldfish in a very small bowl... moving, but not too far.

This little fellow stayed still like a goldfish in a very small bowl… moving, but not getting very far. By the way, I notice he has two left feet…

Buy ‘The Pool Noodler ‘ on Etsy here.

This little girl was playing ball with her friends

This little girl was playing ball with her friends

This little girl was also in on the ball game. She was moving rather like an octopus at an underwater disco.

This little girl was also in on the ball game. She was moving rather like an octopus at an underwater disco. I think I was drawing a bit like another octopus mixing cocktails at the same underwater disco.

Donkeys can’t fly on planes

South Sudanese children tell their stories of survival

Click the invitation to go to KidsOwnPublishing web site to read more

Click the invitation to go to KidsOwnPublishing web site to read more

This is an invitation to attend the launch of the publication Donkeys Can’t Fly on Planes. These powerful stories were written by students from refugee backgrounds at Latrobe English language centre and Traralgon (Liddiard Road) Primary School. A wonderful community collaboration.

Date:  Tuesday August 20, 2013

Time: 6pm

Venue: Art Play, Birrarung Marr Park, Melbourne

This image was done for the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development.

I produced this image of a Sudanese family for the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development last year, as part of a frieze to promote reading to children in the early years.